Continuing the Transformation Process

Following up with last week’s information, I will share steps four and five in  “Part Two: Transforming Past Lessons for the 21st Century Digital Classroom.” from Michael Gorman’s Blog.  If you chose a lesson while reading the first three steps, you can continue to process of transforming this lesson by developing an engaging title and questions, and deciding what technology you will implement in the lesson.  If you would like a planning sheet to record your ideas as you work through these steps, download it here.

I’m sure you’ve already picked up on the fact that these suggestions for transforming your lessons are not solely based on the use of technology.  Technology is a powerful tool for transforming learning, but as you know, the mere presence of technology will not change anything without thoughtful, intentional implementation.  These fact that these steps focus on why technology is used before how it is used makes them useful as we continue to address our building technology goals.

Mel and I are making final preparations for the EdTech Chef Challenge to be held on February 13, and we are looking forward to a day of collaborative learning.  As you think ahead to the day, remember that you are not producing a complete lesson plan script, but a general plan including the why and how you will use your technology ingredients.  The main focus of the competition rubric addresses “why” technology is used.  Why is it used to transform? Why is it used to differentiate?  Why is it used in the formative assessment cycle?  Does this technology use truly enhance the lesson or simply replace another tool or process–or worse yet, hinder learning through unnecessary use?  As you participate in the event, don’t get bogged down in the details (the “how”) of making the technology work perfectly or figuring out every step necessary to setting up a successful assignment–there won’t be time for that.  Begin with your content standard and ISTE Student Standard, then get an idea of what the tech tools can do, and then ask the question “How can we meet our content and ISTE standards along with the requirements of the competition rubric using these technology tools?”  Utilize the strengths of your team and create a truly collaborate result that can be shared with the entire faculty.  Be creative and have fun, but remember that your presentation should be usable in an OTMS classroom.  We hope that the preparation and presentation portions of this competition will be valuable learning experiences, helping us reflect on why and how we currently use technology within instruction, and where our next steps in the process of transformation lie.

 


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